Shane M. Hemberger

Painting for me, I believe, has always been a form of sense perception therapy or exercise. If you believe in personality or psychological trends or types, you will know that those with strong, internal intuitive skills often have weak external sensational skills. This would be myself missing what goes on in the outside world as my normal mode of operating. I spend a huge amount of my time thinking and can often "starve" my external sensing function which will often express itself in a massive craving for exercising and using the external senses. I believe painting is the way I have come to give balance to my overall psychological health and to act as a counterweight to an intuition that runs 24/7.


And that is just it. I have never really been interested in the subject that I am painting or in a story or idea attached to it. For me it has always been the act of painting, of understanding the form and color of what I am painting that was important. It was being caught up in the stream of consciousness of what I am looking at and what I am sensing outwardly that was always of primary concern and drove my art. Consequently because of weak external sensation skills, painting was always difficult for me. It never came naturally or fluid but was quite tortuous to be frank and that was always because my logic and thinking would constantly press it's way into the process. Allowing my intuition to dominate and guide the process has taken many years and practice to become proficient at.


The subject matter I work with is quite simple. I paint mostly the human figure but also work with landscape, animals and some still life. Again, I simply need an "excuse" to paint. I never seem to differentiate one thing from another as is paramount to a huge number of artists for whom the story or idea is central. It is the act of painting and the stream of sensual consciousness that I fall naturally into. My work is my way of getting away from my thinking and its abstraction and becoming more connected to the outside world and the immediacy of sensation.